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INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT

The TSRA Board, as the accountable authority of the TSRA, presents the 2016-2017 annual performance statements of the TSRA, as required under section 39(l)(a) of the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013 (Cth). In the Board's opinion, these annual performance statements accurately reflect the performance of the TSRA and comply with section 39(2) of the Act.

a photograph of signature of Napau Pedro Stephen AM

Napau Pedro Stephen AM
Chairperson

PURPOSE

The purpose of the TSRA is encapsulated in the agency's single outcome statement:

PROGRESS TOWARDS CLOSING THE GAP FOR TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER AND ABORIGINAL PEOPLE LIVING IN THE TORRES STRAIT AREA THROUGH DEVELOPMENT PLANNING, COORDINATION, SUSTAINABLE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, AND PRESERVATION AND PROMOTION OF INDIGENOUS CULTURE.

RESULTS FOR KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS AND ANALYSIS

Increase in the number of Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal owned commercially viable businesses

In 2016-2017, two new Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal businesses were supported through a concessional business loan. In the same period business mentoring and support was provided to six clients.

TABLE 2-3 NUMBER AND VALUE OF CONCESSIONAL BUSINESS LOANS

Year

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

Loans

3

5

1

2

Amount

$114,909

$928,213

$20,628

$162,000

Increased availability of approved business training

In 2016-2017, the TSRA continued to provide face-to-face business training through the delivery of Into Business Workshops.

In 2016-2017, a total of 110 participants attended Into Business Workshops. Post-course surveys indicate a very high level of participant satisfaction with the workshops.

TABLE 2-4 INTO BUSINESS WORKSHOPS PARTICIPATION

Year

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

Courses

6

2

16

18

Participants

24

17

79

110

Increase in catches by Torres Strait and Aboriginal Fishers relative to total allowable catch, strengthening claims for increased ownership

Progress against this indicator cannot be accurately quantified as the requirement to report catch is not mandatory for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal fishers in the region. Therefore comprehensive data to measure tangible outcomes under this indicator does not yet exist. There are ongoing discussions within the Protected Zone Joint Authority (PZJA) to identify and implement a more robust system of data collection, however, this is likely to be a medium- to long-term outcome and remains a challenge for the TSRA and the PZJA.

The best available data can be obtained from the Fisheries Status Reports 2017, produced by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences. Information provided in tables 2-5 to 2-8 is based on this report.

TABLE 2-4 INTO BUSINESS WORKSHOPS PARTICIPATION

Year

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

Courses

6

2

16

18

Participants

24

17

79

110

Increase in catches by Torres Strait and Aboriginal Fishers relative to total allowable catch, strengthening claims for increased ownership

Progress against this indicator cannot be accurately quantified as the requirement to report catch is not mandatory for Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal fishers in the region. Therefore comprehensive data to measure tangible outcomes under this indicator does not yet exist. There are ongoing discussions within the Protected Zone Joint Authority (PZJA) to identify and implement a more robust system of data collection, however, this is likely to be a medium- to long-term outcome and remains a challenge for the TSRA and the PZJA.

The best available data can be obtained from the Fisheries Status Reports 2017, produced by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences. Information provided in tables 2-5 to 2-8 is based on this report.

TABLE 2-5 TROPICAL ROCK LOBSTER CATCH STATISTICS

Year

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

Tropical rock lobster (tonnes)

149

174

207

Notes:
Fishery statistics are provided by fishing season, unless otherwise indicated. Fishing season is 1 December to 30 September. Catch reporting for the Traditional Inhabitant Boat sector is not mandatory and therefore actuals for any year may be higher than reported. The figures are preliminary estimates at the time of printing and are likely to be updated in future editions of this publication. Catch data for 2016-2017 was not available at the time of printing.

TABLE 2-6 FINFISH FISHERIES CATCH STATISTICS FOR TRADITIONAL INHABITANT BOAT LICENSEES

Year

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

Finfish (coral trout and Spanish mackerel) (tonnes)

<1

<1

2

Notes:
Fishery statistics are provided by fishing season, unless otherwise indicated. Fishing season is 1 July to 30 June. Catch reporting for the Traditional In habitant Boat sector is not mandatory and therefore actuals for any year may be higher than reported. The figures are preliminary estimates at time of printing and are likely to be updated in future editions of this publication.

TABLE 2-7 BÊCHE-DE-MER CATCH STATISTICS FOR TRADITIONAL INHABITANT BOAT LICENSEES

Year

>2014

>2015

>2016

Bêche-de-mer (tonnes)

>49

>71

>14

Notes:
Fishery statistics are provided by fishing season, unless otherwise indicated. Fishing season is 1 January to 31 December. Catch reporting for the Traditional Inhabitant Boat sector is not mandatory and therefore actuals for any year may be higher than reported. The figures are preliminary estimates at time of printing and are likely to be updated in future editions of this publication.

The percentage ownership of Torres Strait Commercial Fisheries by Torres Strait Islanders and Aboriginal people in the region

This new indicator was introduced in the Portfolio Budget Statements for 2016-2017.

TABLE 2-8 PERCENTAGE OF TORRES STRAIT COMMERCIAL FISHERY OWNERSHIP, 2016-2017

Fishery

Ownership percentage

Tropical rock lobster

63

Finfish

100

Bêche-de-mer

100

Prawn

Nil

Increase in the number of emerging and professionally active artists and cultural practitioners that have access to information and support to ensure copyright and intellectual property rights

The TSRA conducted the annual Artist Forum in June 2017. The forum covered a wide range of topics covering resilience and confidence, developing a capability statement, service agreements including copyright, communication, registering for an Australian Business Number (ABN) and registering with Supply Nation.

TABLE 2-9 ACTIVE ARTISTS AND CULTURAL PRACTITIONERS

Year

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

Active artists

100

110

117

151

Cultural practitioners

77

80

90

85

Number of Native Title claims successfully determined

The Native Title Representative Body (NTRB) in the Torres Strait is operating predominantly in a post-determination environment with 29 Native Title claims successfully determined as at 30 June 2017. The claims currently being determined within the region are:

  • QUD6040/2001 Torres Strait Regional Sea Claim (Part B)
  • QUD6005/2002WarralandUlui
  • QUD266/2008 Kaurareg People #1
  • QUD267/2008 Kaurareg People #2
  • QUD362/2010 Kaurareg People #3.

Of the 205 Future Acts notices received, responses have been provided to 178.

TABLE 2-10 KEY NATIVE TITLE REPRESENTATIVE BODY RESULTS

Year

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

Active Native Title claims under consideration

3

2

5

5

Future Acts notices received

64

85

66

205

Number of Indigenous Land Use Agreements (ILUA) that have compensation or other benefits as part of ILUA terms

There were seven ILUAs registered with the National Native Title Tribunal in 2016-2017.

Native Title compensation matters are on hold pending the outcomes of the Timber Creek test case. The Timber Creek case is historical as this will be the first time the courts will set a precedent on how to compensate loss of Native Title land.

TABLE 2-11 NUMBER OF INDIGENOUS LAND USE AGREEMENTS FINALISED

Year

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

ILUA finalised

4

12

11

7

Number of endorsed community based management plans for the natural and cultural resources of the region being actively implemented

Dugong and turtle management plans are in place for each outer island community and are being implemented by communities with the support of TSRA. The plans integrate traditional use and contemporary science and management approaches to support the sustainable management of dugong and turtle across the region. A dugong and turtle management plan and permitting regime for the Kaiwalagal region is under development by Traditional Owners with support from the TSRA.

Working on Country Plans are also in place for all communities and these were developed in partnership with key stakeholder groups in the individual communities.

TABLE 2-12 COMMUNITY-BASED MANAGEMENT PLANS

Year

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

Management plans

32

32

32

32

Increase the level of engagement of elected Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal leaders in policy development and decision-making

The primary indicator of the level of engagement is the number of meetings between the elected members of the TSRA and government ministers. This includes engagements by the TSRA Chairperson and Board Members during visits to Canberra, and also engagements with ministers with the TSRA Board during visits by ministers to the region. In this reporting period, there have been 41 high-level engagements with Queensland Government and Australian Government ministers and senior government officials.

TABLE 2-13 HIGH-LEVEL ENGAGEMENTS BY TSRA BOARD MEMBERS

Year

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

Engagements

29

35

36

41

Number of PBCs that achieve Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations (ORIC) compliance as at 31 December each year

All 21 regional Prescribed Bodies Corporate (PBCs) have met the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations compliance requirements. Two PBCs have maintained a level of capacity which has reduced their dependency on grant funding by operating on a fee-for-service cost-recovery model.

TABLE 2-14 PRESCRIBED BODIES CORPORATE COMPLIANCE RESULTS

Year

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

Compliance

20 of 20

21 of 21

21 of 21

21 of 21

Increased investment into new and existing regional environmental health infrastructure

The TSRA successfully secured Queensland Government and Australian Government infrastructure funding for Stage 6 of the Major Infrastructure Programme. There will be 12 projects delivered under Stage 6 and TSRA will work continue to work closely with the region's local government bodies and other key stakeholders in the coming financial year to deliver these projects. Water security for the region will be the major focus of MIP 6.

Improve regional environmental health, telecommunications and marine infrastructure

The TSRA has secured Australian Government and Queensland Government funding for the delivery of Stage 6 of the Major Infrastructure Programme. Twelve projects will be delivered under Stage 6.

In the reporting period, the TSRA and Telstra finalised an $8.26 million agreement to commence works on the first stage of the $22.76 million Torres Strait network infrastructure upgrade project. The project is the first phase of a long-term commitment to expanding high-speed fixed and mobile communications infrastructure to the Torres Strait. Stage one works are well underway and will continue in 2017-2018.

In 2016-2017, the Transport Infrastructure Development Scheme delivered a schedule of works covering land, sea and air transport infrastructure on Torres Strait outer island communities. Marine infrastructure works included barge ramp repairs for Moa, Dauan, Masig and Hammond.

The TSRA and the Queensland Government Department of Transport and Main Roads have also contributed funding in 2016-2017 towards the upgrade of the wharf infrastructure on Hammond Island and works are set to commence in 2017-2018.